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Popular Destinations

The Coffee Route

 

South and South Western Ethiopia and the Harar region are the best places to see big coffee plantations. These regions are the producers of Ethiopia’s worldwide known coffee. A tour can be organized along these major coffee growing regions of Ethiopia – the coffee route. This route helps you discover not only the land of world’s best coffee but also the sites of Tutto Fella, natural endowment of the country, its rich and diverse culture and the world heritage walled city of Harar registered by the UNESCO – a city where the legendary French poet Arthur Rimbaud lived at the turn of the 19th century.  

Ethiopia

Oromo People At Borena

 

The Borana people live in the area of southern Ethiopia from where, it is generally believed, the Ormo launched their northward expansion in the sixteenth century. The present Borena population in Ethiopia is estimated at about 177, 000 and there is a substantial population in northern Kenya. Legend has it that the Borena came from a place called Tulu Namaduri (hill of ancient people) in Balle region and settled in Liban, where today their important shrines are located. Borena women wear colorful shawls and dresses, falling fetchingly off their shoulders. There is an interesting tale about the Borena and their spears. It is said that a Borena woman, even a married one, can have a roll with any man she chooses. The man drives his spear into the ground in front of the hut before he goes in, and even the husband is not allowed to intrude so long as the spear is there. The Borena are also famous for their strong caste system based on age groups. Groups move through stages of life and responsibility together, moving from one stage to another as they age. The Borena and Guji are the least Westernized and have the least contact with the Amhara people, so they retain traditions that may have been general with Oromos but have been discontinued with most.

Yabelo, Ethiopia

Lake Langano

At the Horacallo Bridge it is possible to turn left along a track which leads to the lake. There are good camping spots here along the northern shore. However, the main track to the lake is at about 210 and 215 kms leading left to the Wabe Shebele and Bekele Mola Hotels beach and camping grounds respectively.

The soft brown waters of Langano are set against the blue backdrop of the Arsi Mountains soaring to 4,000 meters. A few birds make Langano their home, but this resort is less for the nature lover than the sportsman and sun worshipper. Here you can water-ski and sail, swim or bask in the blazing sun on the slopping sandy beach. European food is served in the hotel restaurant but the tilapia is good and cooking freshly caught fish over the camp fire has its own special attraction. The local Oromo women are often prepared to sell jewelers or utensils; copper bracelets or brass; bead necklaces and cowries shell decorated milk pots.

Langano, Ethiopia

Pre-historic Archaeological Site

Since 1965, from October to January each year, geologists and archeologists have been camping by the Awash River at this point, because two million years ago at the entrance to the gorge lived some of the earliest ancestors of mankind. They left behind tools, traces of meals and shelters which are now the focus of archeological interest. Here in the lowest levels men of the Middle and later Stone Age have left many examples of beautiful two-edged hand-axes, obsidian scrapers and sets of bolas (the round stones used several together in nets to throw at animals). At Melka Konture also were discovered fossil bone of the hippopotamus, rhinoceros, el-ephant and various antelope.

Ethiopia

Meket Massif

 

Trekking through Ethiopia’s third highest massif in Lalibela is quite a rewarding experience that you should not miss. Located in a fabulous position on rocky escarpments at 2,800m, the Meket Massif is the older site of the trekking tour and it has the most spectacular view of the region. In a clear day, you can see very far away and at night it has the most amazing sky since there is no light pollution. The Milk way can be seen with your naked eyes. Only the condors and ravens seem to have mastered the terrain. A vast world like this leaves plenty of room for the mind to wander, to graze, and to rest. The staggering views from the area were enough to impress Brad Pitt, who visited recently. Along the way, through juniper forests (where lammergeyers could be seen), you will have time to discover the peaceful rhythm of village life stopping at Meket Maryam Church. Sturdy peasants are seen making hay and young shepherds minding their cattle. Working closely with the community, we strive to give you the best time possible. 

Lalibella, Ethiopia

Simien Massif

 

The Simien Mountains present perhaps the most dramatic mountain scenery in Africa - great volcanic plugs formed some 40 million years ago and eroded over the aeons into fantastic crags, pinnacles and flat-topped mountains, “the chess pieces of the Gods” as one writer described them, tower over precipitous gorges, river valleys and plains stretching all the way to Eritrea. There are many peaks over 4,000 metres, and Ras Dashen at 4,620 metres is the highest in the country and the fourth highest in Africa.

Though situated not far from the equator, night temperatures sometimes fall below 0 ° C between October and December. The average daytime temperature is about 15 ° C. Vegetation varies according to altitude following the harsh climate: between 3,000m and 3,600m, heather and hypericum tree spread over the slopes of the mountains, above 3,600m, alpine meadows carpeted with flowers and punctuated by the tall spiky kniphofia or “red hot pokers” and giant lobelia trees create a unique atmosphere. While trekking in the Simiens visitors can see the endemic Gelada or bleeding heart baboon, the Walia Ibex, Simien Wolf and rock hyrax, endemic birds such as the Thick-billed Raven, Black-headed Siskin, White-collared Pigeon, Wattled Ibis, and White-billed Starling. 

Debark, Ethiopia

Nomadic Life, The Desert (danakil, Dallol)

Here there are many points that are more than 100 meters below sea -level where noon time temperature can soar above 50⁰C. Improbable as it may seem, it is inhabited by a host of sturdy people. Hostile and fierce, proud and individualistic, the hundred thousand or so people who wrest a living from this challenging and inhospitable wilderness are the Afar (sometimes called the Danakil).

Ethiopia

Gheralta Massif Tigray

Nothing testifies to the ancientness of Christianity in Tigre more than the province’s rock-hewn churches. Situated on mountain-sides, in gorges, and other out-of-the-way-places, the churches in the Gherlata region offer an undeniable spiritual uplift. Bulky, reddish sandstone mountains and deep canyons reveal millions of years of earth history in their stratification. This is a region of buttes and columns of rock rising hundreds of feet from the valley floor. The colors are clear and intense. The natural grandeur may explain the motives of the ancient church builders, who burrowed their sanctuaries into the awesome architecture of the mountains rather than build less inspiring mud structures at ground level. After the decline of the Axumite Empire in the seventh century, Axumites had every reason to begin hiding their churches on mountaintops outside the capital to keep them safe from intruders. The churches remained all but unknown to the outside world until 1966, but today new roads and decent lodgings are opening up the region.

 

Hawzen, Ethiopia

The Bale Massif

Predominantly populated by Oromos, Bale appears to lie at the heart of the original homeland of these people. Here the land rises to 3,300m where it is covered by a beautiful juniper belt. When we go up further, the terrain would transform into typical Afro-alpine with sparse vegetation dominated by the occasional giant lobelia.  Tulu Deemtu, the second highest peak in Ethiopia, is the climax. Here visitors can see the endemic Ethiopian wolf, Canis simensis, which lives nowhere else in the world. It has just seven populations in Ethiopia and numbers only about 500 individuals in total.

Ethiopia

The South Omo Valley

The Rift Valley forms one of Ethiopia’s most remarkable sights, cutting through the country on a long axis that runs approximately north to south. The Omo River travels roughly 1,000 kilometers, crossing from southwestern Ethiopia into Kenya. Dozens of tribes inhabit a tiny space, with their varied customs, elaborate hairdos, and their handicrafts of wood, cowry shells, or beads. The most prominent of them, the Hamer have some of the most elaborate body decorations in the world. There are also the Mursi, famed for the lip plates that their women wear, as well as the Karo, Ari, Bana, Tsemai, Arbore, to name a few. Yet some of the time honored customs of this indigenous people are being challenged by incursions of modernity.

Ethiopia